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wanted quote for someone to pull out garden decking and level a raised


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#1 filmbuffy

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 10:52 AM

hi there,

looking for local quotes for my small garden. it is fully decked and is a victorian terrace so is raised with a couple of steps going up.
what i would like is a little decking.. and the rest earth... or will be turf.

so decking needs pulling up. what remains of a little wall need to come down and whatevers under the decking gotten rid of so its all flat and level.

thanks

jade

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#2 Andy

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 10:45 PM

Interesting, and without wishing to detract from your original post and request, but I have always thought that timber decking was always an absolute waste of space. I mean we live in a fairly wet country and people still want to put a product in their garden that eventually will fail, and rot away!!

Never could see the attraction myself! :huh:

#3 misspoddy

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Posted 03 April 2011 - 08:53 PM

Not to mention that it turns into a slippery ice rink when wet and attracts rats as they love living underneath! Stupidest idea.... like... ever!

#4 Spoon

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:30 AM

I'm going to sound like a stuck record with shares in Steve Bateman plc but this could well be a job for Steve Bateman. He did our garden stuff very well, when he said he would, at reasonable rates, etc and is a very nice chap.

#5 filmbuffy

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 11:29 AM

i think the previous owners decked it as it was left an untamed reck of a garden and it was easier to just deck over it all... it does look neat... but too neat and boring. want more planting space.
will keep a little decking as grass can be muddy and your garden chairs sink into it. so i guess both have pros and cons :-)

#6 Sylvester

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 05:53 PM

Thanks, I was thinking of putting down some decking in our garden but you've put me right off the idea! My other half will be pleased ... :rolleyes:
aka Pie

#7 charlie

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 06:13 PM

hi there,

looking for local quotes for my small garden. it is fully decked and is a victorian terrace so is raised with a couple of steps going up.
what i would like is a little decking.. and the rest earth... or will be turf.

so decking needs pulling up. what remains of a little wall need to come down and whatevers under the decking gotten rid of so its all flat and level.

thanks

jade


Hi Film buffy - Happy to come and help you take up the decking for a very small fee, and I'll take away the wood too if you are local.Not sure about the turfing though best left to the professionals. PM me if you are interested.

#8 Nanazola

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 06:53 PM

Re whether to deck or not, the front part of our garden was a maze of different levels and steps, with no room on any of them to do more than perch a chair precariously close to a drop. Decking has more than doubled the usable area of the garden, looks beautiful and unobtrusive - and it's really not that slippy! As for rats, they're also partial to sheds, composts, bird feeders and what have you, so anyone with a garden has to keep an eye out for em. Don't diss the deck I say, it's transformed our summers.

#9 Hermit

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 09:15 PM

Regular cleaning on decking really helps preventing it getting too slippery, pressure washing once or twice a year does the trick.
It's when you get a few years worth of algae on it that it becomes treacherous.
Filmbuffy, you may want to bring in a new layer of topsoil for the turfing as that under the decking has not had much light and may not be too fertile. Better to be on the safe side.

#10 charlie

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 09:52 PM

Re whether to deck or not, the front part of our garden was a maze of different levels and steps, with no room on any of them to do more than perch a chair precariously close to a drop. Decking has more than doubled the usable area of the garden, looks beautiful and unobtrusive - and it's really not that slippy! As for rats, they're also partial to sheds, composts, bird feeders and what have you, so anyone with a garden has to keep an eye out for em. Don't diss the deck I say, it's transformed our summers.


Hmm, agree - though your decking is on the Do South quality scale Nana - well and truly stylish and functional - check out that photo it looks like it needs putting down or else in the wood burning stove. ;-/.

That garden needs lifting - too much timber - some nice grass, some soft planting - climbers on the fence etc to add colour and vibrancy, and perhaps a small area of hard landscaping - sympathetic stone slabs or brick traditional terracing. Not decking though. IMHO :P

Regular cleaning on decking really helps preventing it getting too slippery, pressure washing once or twice a year does the trick.
It's when you get a few years worth of algae on it that it becomes treacherous.
Filmbuffy, you may want to bring in a new layer of topsoil for the turfing as that under the decking has not had much light and may not be too fertile. Better to be on the safe side.


Agree about the top soil Hermy - fancy joining forces - "Groundforce" comes to mind. ;)

Edited by charlie, 04 April 2011 - 09:57 PM.


#11 Hermit

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:18 PM

Agree about the top soil Hermy - fancy joining forces - "Groundforce" comes to mind. ;)

Was that the episode where Tommy did all the hard work and Alan took all the credit ;)

#12 filmbuffy

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 03:36 PM

Hmm, agree - though your decking is on the Do South quality scale Nana - well and truly stylish and functional - check out that photo it looks like it needs putting down or else in the wood burning stove. ;-/.

That garden needs lifting - too much timber - some nice grass, some soft planting - climbers on the fence etc to add colour and vibrancy, and perhaps a small area of hard landscaping - sympathetic stone slabs or brick traditional terracing. Not decking though. IMHO :P



Agree about the top soil Hermy - fancy joining forces - "Groundforce" comes to mind. ;)


eh hope you not referring to my garden... " putting down".
that was taken in the winter i may add with very little growth.
it does look very neat when tidy.. just boring i think. ... i asked for a little help... not a critique B) :P

#13 Marc.K1

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 03:30 PM

Hi there,

I have sent you a PM.

Many thanks

Marc Kellaway

#14 James

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 10:37 PM

Agree with Hermit about the pressure washer - should come up a treat.

The algae issue is really caused by a couple of things - the boards have been laid without gaps, and there's probably not a sufficient incline for the water to run off. It's not ideal but once it's been jetted down in the Spring this isn't something that will really bother you until the following year.

However you really could do with some plants and by the looks of things some that will keep their interest round the year, are low maintenance, and quickly add impact. Dare I mention phormiums? I have found some cracking bargains so it won't break the bank to have a go. See the other topic for my update on those.

Another thing you could try is grasses from seed. For about 10 you could pick up some seed trays and seed compost and then spend another 10 on seeds. I have been buying seeds from Bob Todd on eBay and they typically cost about 1.25 per pack then plus 80p postage for as many packs as you want. Seeds I'm just about to sow include sanguisorba menziesii, sanguisorba hakusenensis, stipa tenuissima, uncinia egmontiana, anthericum liliago, meconopsis regia, anemone leveillei, libertia peregrinans 'gold stripe', astelia nervosa chathamica... some are a little more experimental than others but Bob has lots of interesting things on offer and having a go is half the fun.

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#15 James

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 10:55 PM

Forgot to mention that we've also acquired several types of sedge grasses at boot sales, divided the clumps and potted up into several smaller pots. I've also done this with a pot of chives because they seem to grow quite easy and have nice flowers (handy for posh salads too).

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