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Mice/rats/squirrels in the loft


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#1 RetiredMember1

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 01:10 PM

I was woken up by some scuttling in my loft last night! I suspect the rain or cold has driven a creature or two inside... Can anyone recommend an effective course of action? Bromley Council charges £74 for pest control so a home cure's my preferred option I know that without sealing up all the access points, it's unlikely I'll see the back of them permanently, but the loft is only part boarded, so I can't reach all the corners. There's no food up there, but I know they will eat anything and really don't want them chewing my insulation or, worse still, electric cables. Google research http://www.primrose....CFRRc4Qod7RglIw points to a sonar device being one humane way forward, avoiding the need for capture (tricky to do and they find their way back) or trapping or baiting (cruel and I'd rather avoid concealed rotting corpses) - does anyone have one I might borrow?

#2 Summit Lover

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 07:46 PM

Hi Gill,

Don't bother with the sonar devices - from bitter experience I can attest that they don't work.

I have had problems with squirrels and pigeons in our loft due to a poorly maintained roof. The management company have blocked one access point and got rid of the pigeons, but the squirrels are still getting in via a couple of broken roof tiles awaiting replacement. I think that blocking access points is the only option apart from getting in the pest control pepes - and if it is squirrels apparently they have to trap them and release them elsewhere.

#3 Hermit

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 08:17 PM

I know a few people that have sonar devices to keep out foxes from the garden and they say they are pretty good.
Also, a friend bought one to deter cats from pooing on his pea shingle which also worked but for some reason attracted hedgehogs which liked the sound and used to stand on the shingle and look at the devise which was pretty cool as my friend likes hedgehogs.

#4 Summit Lover

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 08:30 PM

Well they certainly don't work with squirrels or pigeons!

#5 Borgus

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:58 PM

A certain amount of care is needed when dealing with loft spaces.

Ventilation is essential, especially during very cold periods, to prevent or minimise condensation forming on the underside of the roofing felt. Continued exposure to moisture will affect timbers in the long term and the tell-tale staining may be off putting to potential buyers.

Air normally passes through slots or holes in the eaves (the lowest point of the roof). Mordern or refurbished roofs may have ventilation built into the roof or ridge tiles. By all means fit a fine mesh to block access, but do NOT block the flow of air.

If condensation is a problem, then there a number of solutions that permit the flow of air, but prevent access by animals and insects.

Don't forget that lighting cable, and possibly water pipes, will be lurking under any insulation and care needs to be taken. Also wear a mask to avoid breathing in any fibreglass or other dust particles.

I've never had any success with sonic or scent based solutions. An effective and permanent solution may be:



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"It does not require many words to speak the truth." - Chief Joseph

#6 RetiredMember1

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 12:47 AM

Really helpful, everyone - thanks! I had thought those holes by the eaves were signs of roof damage, Borgus, not realising they were probably left for ventilation purposes. I was amused by the hedgehog anecdote, Hermit! Thanks for saving me money, SL. Let's see whether the blighters are back tonight...

#7 Archie

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:20 AM

I have tried these sonar things in the past and it drove the birds away as well as the critters I needed shifting.
It also greatly upset the neighbours very small baby.

Humane trap and release whatever it is back into the wilds of CP!

#8 St. Lukes Railings

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:58 AM

As vermin can you not put poison down for the squirrels ? (presuming they are grey) aswell as for the rats?

#9 RetiredMember1

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:19 AM

That's an insight into the downsides of the sonar, Archie! Google tells me the red squirrel is legally protected, but the grey squirrel is protected, SLR! I'm going to try a pre-baited Rentokil mouse & rat box in the first instance. No noise last night, thank goodness - perhaps I have bats in the belfry instead... :blink:

#10 St. Lukes Railings

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:44 AM

I dont think it is. You are breaking the law if you release them into the wild

#11 RetiredMember1

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 10:33 AM

No, you're quite right, my post was nonsense due to a typo! I meant to say the red squirrel is legally protected, but the grey squirrel is vermin - duh!

#12 Dazza

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 10:36 AM

The red squirrel is protected the grey squirrel is classified as vermin unless something has happened recently !

Borgus advice I would suggest is for newer build properties which tend to be much better insulated but if you have an older property you will have probably have a lot of natural ventilation in the roof & this would probably not be a problem ! Even if it was there are several products that could be retrospectively installed to remove condensation.



Dazza

Kill them & then eat them !

Dazza
Your obviously mistaken me with someone who gives a fig

#13 RetiredMember1

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:07 AM

My house was built in 1988, Dazza, so perhaps Borgus' advice applies? I can definitely see daylight in the corners of the loft.

#14 St. Lukes Railings

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:14 AM

GillW. Are you trying to tell us something here? Did you really just buy your 'house' from Milletts and actually 'live' on empty land in West Norwood ?

I think I've outed you :D

#15 Dazza

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:25 AM

There are still lots of product & different vents you can add retrospectively but gaps in the eves are not considered proper ventilation if anything I would see this as poor quality workmanship !

Fill them up & suck & see & if it causes a problem ( which i doubt ) then get a proper vent into the roof ! I can assure you gaps in eves is not a mandatory requirement under document F of the buiding regs ( Ventialtion) to ventilate your property.

Dazza
Your obviously mistaken me with someone who gives a fig