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New Photography Exhibition from Trevor Christie at the Carnegie Librar

Trevor Christie photography urban realism analogue 35mm Herne Hill Carnegie Library street photojournalism

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#1 Bloggsy09

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 02:53 AM

You may recall in summer I bigged up Trevor Christie's photography exhibition at the Diverse Gallery in Brixton on this forum. Great show and a good response from here too. And then I wondered where his next show would happen. Turns out, it is happening in Herne Hill and at the Carnegie Library no less! Christie is also a Herne Hill resident! Max Rush's colour wildlife, portrait, and landscape work makes way for TC's more stark and urban and chiefly black and white work ... such a great venue for it too - wonderful juxtaposition.

This show runs from Private View on Friday 20 January (7pm to 9pm) until Tues 31 Jan. Phone the Carnegie for general opening times - 020 7926 6050.

It should be more or less the same body of work as at the Diverse (with a few new interesting additions, see below). Which then amounted to approx 200 mainly B&W prints - all traditional "analogue" photography not digital. 35mm film stock and hand done prints. That exhibition was titled 'Steel and Glass' as these represent the main components of the traditional camera. This show is just called 'Photography'. There's bound to be a broad range of subject matter - most of it urban (aka 'street') portraiture portraying lean, stark and confused times but doing so with a sense of wonder. Timeless gritty begging beauty. Shadows, ghosting and blurring blending reportage with impression - some photos reminiscent of 40s and 50s urban realism but layered with an ethereal quality due to imperfection only tactile photography and its processing can bring.

It is fantastic that Trevor is showing at the Carnegie, also a timeless place yet one which could do with a shot of cutting-edge and something more in tune with our confusing times. It is a beautiful, much-loved building but faces grave difficulties in future, faced as it is with closure in the not-too-distant future unless cash can be raised to keep it afloat. People read less, it is hard to heat and service, and without the many volunteers who put in time gratis, it may already have been shut. This show is a wonderful opportunity for people who don't use libraries in a traditional fashion (or don't read anymore, except perhaps on their Kindle or Kogan) to come in for something different. There's a lot worse than the local library becoming a local art gallery (more ideas anyone?) and for all of you traditionalists out there, take heart! What with his 35mm approach, Trevor is a traditionalist too!

Come support local photography, use your local library, and show support for the Carnegie, all in one go!
You can see many of Trevor's works on show on his Flickr web pages and these include print titles as well as notes:
http://www.flickr.co...s/37663439@N03/

But you'd do so much better seeing these in person to fully appreciate them. Digital can never do them justice!





#2 Bloggsy09

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 11:40 PM

Trevor Christie photo show early Carnegie cancellation


Last week I posted up about Trevor Christie's long-awaited photo show at the Carnegie Library. It was a great Private View for opening night, nice turnout. But Trevor has has to pull the plug on the show early - it was meant to run through the 31st. He's sorry about that. He says: "due to work related issues the show will be made available at another venue". But he has updated his Flickr page to include the show photos, which were fewer but much larger than expected. You can see these at:

http://www.flickr.co...s/37663439@N03/

Attached File  TC1 Carnegie.jpg   166.02KB   0 downloads





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Trevor Christie, photography, urban realism, analogue, 35mm, Herne Hill, Carnegie Library, street photojournalism