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New Telephone Line

Connecting TV to a phone line

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#1 belo

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 10:18 AM

Does anybody know who could connect our TV to a phone line? We would like the new phone line to run outside of the house, and then come in through the wall, near the TV aerial.

Is it an electrician I need? Or, are there people who specialise in this sort of work. We're with Sky. I'm sure I could call them, but they would charge an arm and a leg for a relatively simple job. I've had a look on yell.com and I've found one listing for somebody specialising in 'Telephone line services' with a mobile number to contact them on. I feel a bit unsure about contacting somebody without a recommendation, or any information about the company on a website.

Any suggestions gratefully appreciated!

#2 The Joker

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 04:35 PM

I'm no expert on this, but is there a telephone line running into your house already? Perhaps just disconnected? In that case an electrician or anyone local who puts up tv arials etc could probably then run it to your tv.

If you need a brand new line I imagine this will need to be installed by whichever provider you choose. Try the comparison websites to find the cheapest deals available for line rental etc. Should be able to get a basic package for £6/7 a month.

#3 Woodvale

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 09:10 PM

I'm intrigued by the idea of connecting a TV to a phone line. To what purpose? I know of internet-ready TVs where one can connect it to the broadband router and access BBC iPlayer, and watch streamed video, but that uses computer network cabling, like the cable that connects your router to your main computer.

But if there is a need to connect your TV to a phone line, you've lots of options, but if you're talking about a new telephone line from the exchange, then you've got to get it through an existing phone company - BT, Virgin, Sky, Talk Talk, etc. You'll probably have to pay an installation fee which could be several hundred pounds or more if there are no spare circuits between the exchange and your nearest distribution point, but with fibre already or being installed between the exchanges and the DPs, this problem will ultimately disappear.

If you're talking about an internal extension from your master socket, then you can employ someone to do it for you - there are actually lots of kits on the market than enable you to do it yourself. If it is an extension you're looking for, you should check with your current supplier what the REN is for your line - this is the number of devices that can be physically connected to the phone circuit without impacting the ringing signal. If you have more than that number, usually 4, you might find that your phones don't ring any longer when you get an incoming call.

Many of the traders offering telephone extensions installation services are current or former BT or Virgin technicians using their skills to do a bit of out of hours work. Get two to come and do a quote for you, then you can get an idea of cost and see how they work. If they measure up the job and discuss different routes with you and the possibilities of losing ringing tone if you've too many devices connected, then they probably know their onions.

If you're actually wanting to connect your TV to your router so you can access the internet from it, then you might prefer to consider using Powerline adaptors. These enable you to use the mains circuits in your house as a network and avoid having wires strung all over the place. You plug one adaptor into a mains socket next to your routers and connects the two by a cable, and plug the other adapter in a mains socket next to your TV. Once you've connected the TV to the adaptor with a cable, you can quiickly pair the adaptors (always use the encryption option) and, voila, your TV is connected to your router, and then to the internet. You can have multiple adaptors connected via the mains to the one next to the router giving you internet access anywhere you're near a socket. A pair will set you back £50 or thereabouts, probably a lot less than paying someone to come and string cable around the house and through walls.

I've a TP-Link PA201 adaptor connected to the router and have two other computers and a games console connected to their own PA201s. My son's PC is upstairs and the internet speed he sees is more than enough for streaming video and playing online games.

Hope that helps.

#4 Borgus

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 10:55 PM

I think you need to be clear about exactly you require. I assume you need a new extension phone socket near the TV in order to receive additional services on your Sky box. The added complication is that you require the extension cable to be run on the outside wall.

Adding a phone extension socket is very easy. The simplest way is a kit that provides a new surface mounted socket with a cable that plugs into an existing socket with an adapter. More permanent is to hard wire a new cable into the new and existing sockets. These are DIY jobs that need simple tools and to follow supplied instructions.

If there is no alternative to running the cable externally, then a different type of cable is required. The standard white phone cable is not suitable for external use.

An additional extension socket does not need to be run from the master socket (this is the first socket where the external cable connects). It can be run from any existing socket.
"It does not require many words to speak the truth." - Chief Joseph

#5 belo

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 03:42 PM

I've probably explained what I want completely wrongly and am being quite stupid here.... Sorry. I hope my husband doesn't see my post! Please don't tell him

Anyway, we can't watch Sky Anytime, or use the internet features on our TV as we get the message that we need to connect our TV to a telephone line. Yes, it is an existent telephone line we want to connect it to. We would like, if possible, it to come from the master socket (front of the house, 1st floor) to the living room (front of house, ground floor). Our broadband connection is patchy when we connect our router to any other socket other than the master socket. So, I'm assuming that we would be better off getting the TV connected to the master socket? So, I think I need an external extension cable. Am I correct? And if so, is it an Electrician I phone and ask them to do this for me? Or, do I need a specialised telephone person? I know that I definitely want somebody else to do it for me as I seem to be lacking the DIY gene and my husband most definitely does!

Any help, suggestions, advice gratefully received!

Thank you.

#6 Woodvale

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 10:12 PM

"To get Sky Anytime, you have to connect your Sky box to your router" - so says Sky about Anytime. It doesn't say how, but routers don't have telephone line connections, only wireless or network cable connections. If it's a router-modem, then there will be a telephone line coming into the router, but that's as far as it goes.

If your TV is internet-enabled, check the manual for the type of cable to connect it to the router. I think you'll find it's an RJ45, which is network cable, rather than an RJ11, which is for a telephone line. The RJ11 has four contacts, the RJ45 has 8, so they're easy to tell apart.

I think you need to connect your Sky box to the router, as it says, using a network cable. You certainly don't need an electrician. You could use a telephone technician. It'd be cheaper, probably, to get a couple of Powerline adaptors as I suggested earlier.

#7 Woodvale

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 11:33 AM

When I wrote this last night, I was very tired so apologies for the somewhat garbled response, mentioning cables then going straight to talking about RJ numbers, which are actually the jack plug types that go on the end of the cables.

I'm pretty certain it is an ethernet network connection you need, not a telephone one. A friend of mine has an internet-ready TV, and it's certainly an ethernet network cable that is used to connect that to the Sky router.

You mention that you get flaky broadband when you connect the router to phone sockets other than the master. This suggests your internal extension cabling is not adequate for the ADSL signal, so you should leave the router where it is. I'd definitely recommend Powerline adaptors for providing computer network connections elsewhere in the house, as you can then give ethernet-capable devices internet access by plugging a Powerline adaptor into an electric power socket nearby and and linking then with an ethernet network cable (Cat-5, available from Maplins, PC World). A pair of TP-Link PA211 Powerline adaptors are available on Amazon at the moment for £33.99, so I'm sure that'll be the cheapest option.

If you would rather have a wired connection, and it's going outside the house, you're going to need holes drilled and weather-proofed after the cable is run, so a telephone technician should have all the necessary skills and equipment. The external cable should be terminated in boxes attached to the wall or skirting board with RJ45 sockets so you can link them with standard ethernet cables to the router and TV. You shouldn't just have a single cable running from the router to the TV through holes in walls and outside the house.