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Well known people who lived in the area


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#16 Summit Lover

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 03:17 PM

Croydon?

#17 Senor Buckethead

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 07:38 PM

Doesn't or did Colin Collings live in Penge?
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#18 Uncle Wilf

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 10:04 AM

Possibly Thornton Heath.
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#19 Senor Buckethead

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 04:07 PM

Can't say I've noticed any blue plaques down there - not that my life insurance covers me to venture there..
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#20 Elmo

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 05:40 PM

Kelly Brooke. She used to live on Lawrie Park Road I think...
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#21 Summit Lover

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 06:01 PM

Can't say I've noticed any blue plaques down there - not that my life insurance covers me to venture there..

The platform information boards were down at Clap Jct a couple of days ago. The tannoy announcement said that the next train would stop at CP so I duly boarded it. It didn't - and I ended up in Thornton Heath :( Very different atmosphere on the streets there compared to CP.

#22 Summit Lover

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 09:57 PM

Ok - so not a person.... but the Sparra's predecessor getting a mention! (probably another Hollybush but never mind :)).





And now I'm in the Hollybush baby, the Hollybush.
The Hollybush baby....
sitting at the table where it all began for us...

and everything else is momentary and
everything else just stops.

I'll have another pint of Stella please Bro'.
And I'll remember before this place was so cool and so full
I'll remember you wearing a yellow t-shirt
you had a friend, I was dying to meet her and we did
back in the day.

#23 Abu Nuwas

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:08 AM

Thomas Crapper is surely worthy of a mention? Especially when the area was painted by Pissarro?

He lived off Croydon Rd, Penge or Anerley, going in the direction of the burnt down unfortunately Goat House, past the burnt down unfortunately Robin Hood --both happily rebuilt as something more useful. Near Crapper, lived Walther de la Mare, who for many decades was England's favorite poet. Hhe was perhaps fortunate that his son got to run Fabers, along with Eliot, when Eliot's style of writing was more to the taste of the literati-- that is, people selected by Fabers...Many people' of a certain age' still have some of De la Mare's poems off by heart. He was visited by Rupert Brooke, and I calculate that sometimes Brooke wandered down my leafy road....which reminds me: some humorist above made a crack at the expense of Penge, that they could not afford the insurance premiums to go there. Hmmm..... some other thread is calling....

There were a few crims as well, but I would rather end with another poet, Thomas Campbell, who wrote quite a few things , like 'Ye Mariners of England' and my favorite:

Lord Ullin's Daughter

A chieftain, to the Highlands bound,
Cries, ``Boatman, do not tarry!
And I'll give thee a silver pound
To row us o'er the ferry!''--

``Now, who be ye, would cross Lochgyle,
This dark and stormy weather?''
``O, I'm the chief of Ulva's isle,
And this, Lord Ullin's daughter.--

``And fast before her father's men
Three days we've fled together,
For should he find us in the glen,
My blood would stain the heather.

``His horsemen hard behind us ride;
Should they our steps discover,
Then who will cheer my bonny bride
When they have slain her lover?''--

Out spoke the hardy Highland wight,--
``I'll go, my chief--I'm ready:--
It is not for your silver bright;
But for your winsome lady:

``And by my word! the bonny bird
In danger shall not tarry;
So, though the waves are raging white,
I'll row you o'er the ferry.''--

By this the storm grew loud apace,
The water-wraith was shrieking;
And in the scowl of heaven each face
Grew dark as they were speaking.

But still as wilder blew the wind,
And as the night grew drearer,
Adown the glen rode armèd men,
Their trampling sounded nearer.--

``O haste thee, haste!'' the lady cries,
``Though tempests round us gather;
I'll meet the raging of the skies,
But not an angry father.''--

The boat has left a stormy land,
A stormy sea before her,--
When, O! too strong for human hand,
The tempest gather'd o'er her.

And still they row'd amidst the roar
Of waters fast prevailing:
Lord Ullin reach'd that fatal shore,--
His wrath was changed to wailing.

For, sore dismay'd through storm and shade,
His child he did discover:--
One lovely hand she stretch'd for aid,
And one was round her lover.

``Come back! come back!'' he cried in grief
``Across this stormy water:
And I'll forgive your Highland chief,
My daughter!--O my daughter!''

'Twas vain: the loud waves lash'd the shore,
Return or aid preventing:
The waters wild went o'er his child,
And he was left lamenting.

He lived in Sydenham.

Edited by Abu Nuwas, 24 January 2013 - 12:10 AM.