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What are you reading?


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#16 wmp

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:33 PM

Andyb - yeah, legends have a way of getting confused (much as I do now!) :P

As for Troy - yes, it's my first time. Any suggestions as to translations of the Iliad? I read EV Rieu as a teenager, but have also studied texts by Fitzgerald, Earl of Derby, Fagles... Or should I just stick to Logue's new reworkings? Choices, choices... Meanwhile, I've got one of the Schliemann volumes on the archaology of Troy, which I've dipped into from time to time, but really might read a bit more... So many books, so little time... :)

#17 Milou

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:38 PM

For leisure I have just finished reading The Bookseller of Kabul by Åsne Seierstad, which I would really recommend, not for the writing (which is fine but quite simple) but for the insight into life in Afgahnistan....the oppression of women just made me want to scream!

For not-leisure (i.e. college, my part time history & archaeology degree) I am reading 'Burial' Society and context in the Roman World' for an essay I'm trying to write on Roman burials....

I have to say on the Da Vinci Code vibe, that it is a very fun and gripping book to read, but it is sooooooo badly written. Pure book candy...can't believe people take it as fact. I wanted to throw the book out the window when I read the pure gorgonzola ending. but glad I have read it so I know what the fuss was all about! Would definitely NOT read anymore of his stuff though...

#18 andyb

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:45 PM

Fitzgerald is my favourite, but the Logue stuff is a fantastic reworking.

Never read Schliemann's own books but I found Leonard Cottrell's Bull of Minos an excellent overview of him and Arthur Evans for the beginner. It's hard to get but I'd be happy to lend you a copy (I can't remember if you've said what you do? - if you're an archaeologist it might be a bit basic!)

Troy is a great site but a tad confusing - a guide is useful. There used to be a fantastic bloke who also ran the nearby cafe. He grew up beside the site and knows it backwards, along with gossip about the various archaeologists who dug there. I could find out his name at home if you like?

#19 Mango

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:47 PM

Just finished 'A Short History of Nearly Everything' - great laymans terms science.

Now reading Paula: My Story so Far by Paula Radcliffe, Nothern Lights by Philip Pullman, and Green Dolphin Street by Sebastian Faulks.

All time favs probably Birdsong and Captain Corelli's (and no, I'm not a girl) :lol:

or I forgot: Perfume by Patrick Suskind

Edited by Crushed Mango 2, 09 March 2005 - 12:48 PM.

M A N G O

#20 peggysue

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:49 PM

I'm reading Small Island by Andrea Levy. It follows the fortunes of Jamaican immigrants arriving in Britain after World War II, and the racial tensions of the time. Its particularly fascinating to learn of the many Jamaican men that joined British forces to fight for their 'mother country' during the war, yet were shunned when attempting to intergrate into British society afterwards. It is fantastic and has a good dose of humour too.

Before that I read and thoroughly enjoyed 'Curious incident of the Dog in the Night time' by Mark Haddon.

#21 Georgie

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 12:56 PM

I'm also reading Small Island. Really enjoying it because I fee you can hear the voices in the writing. I drive to work and don't get a chance to read on the way so am envious of those of you who carry a book around in your bag. I have already lined up the latest A Shreve as my next read.

#22 Retired_Member_2

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:00 PM

Just getting into "The Time Traveler's Wife" by Audrey Niffenegger as it was recommended by my librarian. I never know what to read, so thanks AndyB for starting this thread :)

Incidently I really enjoyed The Trial and Metamorphoses

#23 Charlotte

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:18 PM

All so highbrow!

I have just finished "Heaven knows I'm miserable now". Andrew Collins recollections of his difficult 1980's at art college. Highly enjoyable nostalgia that I don't really need to "think" about, just laugh at the comparisons to my own life.

#24 wmp

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:28 PM

AndyB - I'd forgotton about Cottrell's Bull of Minos, which I know I've got - most of my books are currently out of sight, or double packed in the shelves, due to the decorater at home - I shall brave the wrath of the paintpot & seek it out ... (2nd bookcase on the left, behind the penguin classics, I think!) - but many thanks for the offer! (I'm not an archaeologist - but am connected with that world...)

We're going to Turkey with Jules Verne - we had a *** of a year, with moving, etc, & decided someone else can do the legwork - so we have a guide attached to the tour. A cop out, I know, but means I can catch up on the reading & let someone else worry about where we're going to stay! :) - but it would be good to have the name of the bloke at the cafe, just in case we escape our tour guide!

Have just finished "The Little White Car" by Danuta de Rhodes - wry, and slightly wierd...

#25 JGX

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:29 PM

I am re-reading what is without a doubt the best book I have ever read (first read it. . . ooh too many years ago) called: The Quincunx by Charles Palliser.

It's a mammoth read but I can heartily recommend it!

Cheers,

#26 andyb

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:38 PM

Have just finished "The Little White Car" by Danuta de Rhodes - wry, and slightly wierd...

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Which, believe it or not, is written by Dan Rhodes, a friend of mine - he is also wry, and slightly weird.

#27 wmp

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:42 PM

Yes - I read his "Timoleon Vieta Come Home" - that's wierd rather more than wry!

#28 rachel

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:42 PM

Totally non high-brow here, I have got a few on the go at the moment:

"Feel" the biog of Robbie Williams - not keen on his music, but the book is good

"The Time Traveller's Wife" - though have to admit not started it yet

and someone has reminded me I have not yet started A Short History of Nearly Everything, despite it being on my shelf for over a year.

I also have "Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell" ready to start as well.

Trouble is, it's not really safe for me to read on the tube, seeing as I am the one driving it!

#29 gekko

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:43 PM

That looks like a great book JGX. Will have to look that one up.
Mel, Forum Moderator

#30 andyb

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:44 PM

I am re-reading what is without a doubt the best book I have ever read (first read it. . . ooh too many years ago) called: The Quincunx by Charles Palliser.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Lot's of people have recommended this to me, but it's quite daunting. I'll give it a go soon . . .