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What are you reading?


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#31 Rosehip

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 01:57 PM

I'm reading 'The Victorian House' by Judith Flanders, which is an excellent and very accessible social history of Victorian life, room by room. Great for any one who has ever lived in a Victorian house.
Also, recently finished David Sedaris' 'Dress Your Family in Courduroy and Denim' (heard it serialised on R4) - funny and and wry personal essays/memoirs on his early life - very entertaining.

Rosehip


PS. Jon, Justine and Joy up at the Bookseller Crow are always happy to make recommendations!

#32 Mango

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 02:04 PM

"and someone has reminded me I have not yet started A Short History of Nearly Everything, despite it being on my shelf for over a year." - a quote. the button didn't work!

I recommend it - it's a fascinating read full of colourful characterisation and history, as well as of course, the science. It tells you as much about the era that the people lived in as the discoveries they made - I found it fascinating, although knowing that it's all pretty simplified. It will also make you want to watch that programme about Supervolcanoes that's on this coming Sunday and Monday . . .

Edited by Crushed Mango 2, 09 March 2005 - 02:05 PM.

M A N G O

#33 JGX

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 02:18 PM

Lot's of people have recommended this to me, but it's quite daunting. I'll give it a go soon . . .

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#34 peggysue

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 02:24 PM

Georgie I know what you mean about being able to hear the voices in Small Island - particularly Gilbert Joseph - he really reminds me of Patrick Trueman off Eastenders for some reason, maybe the way he is always exasperated by his woman!

#35 gekko

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 02:34 PM

I'm reading 'The Victorian House' by Judith Flanders, which is an excellent and very accessible social history of Victorian life, room by room. Great for any one who has ever lived in a Victorian house.

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I'm reading this a bit at a time whilst reading other books. It's very good and you get a real sense of Victorian life and the growth of London particularly.
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#36 HeadGardener

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 11:13 PM

I've just started Atomised by Michel Houllebecq - would have made more progress with it if my husband hadn't snatched it away to read first, the cad. Before that, read The Family of Pascal Duarte by a Spanish writer whose name I've already forgotten (shame on me as it was an excellent book) and then it will be Hidden Lives by Margaret Forster. I don't always read such lofty works - I have dabbled in Joanna Trollope in the past - but have just joined a book group and had to raise my game.

#37 Elmo

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 02:35 PM

I'm going to start Change Witness by Matthew Parris very soon. He's been a Tory MP and a sketch writer so he should have some interesting insights on the Parliamentary process... <_<

Edited by Elmo, 10 March 2005 - 02:36 PM.

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#38 charlie

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 03:00 PM

Has anyone read any of the sparkle hayter books

#39 rachel

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 03:02 PM

"and someone has reminded me I have not yet started A Short History of Nearly Everything, despite it being on my shelf for over a year." - a quote. the button didn't work!

I recommend it - it's a fascinating read full of colourful characterisation and history, as well as of course, the science. It tells you as much about the era that the people lived in as the discoveries they made - I found it fascinating, although knowing that it's all pretty simplified. It will also make you want to watch that programme about Supervolcanoes that's on this coming Sunday and Monday . . .

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I promise to start it next week when I am on standby at work! I had it in my bag for yesterday (gawd the bag was heavy - it's the hardback!), but I got a job straightaway and had no time to read.

Edited by rachel, 10 March 2005 - 03:09 PM.


#40 belli

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 04:23 PM

I'm currently reading 'The Line of Beauty' by Alan Hollinghurst. Having grown up during the Thatcher years, its interesting to read a book set in that period from the perspective of the upper-class Tory.

I would heartily recommend Boris Akunin's 'The Winter Queen' and 'Leviathan'. Good old fashioned mysteries with a Russian flavour. Unputdownable!

#41 lucysmith

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 05:05 PM

I have just been away for two weeks and have read:

My life as a fake - Peter Carey

Dirt Music - Tim Winton

The no 1 ladies detective agency - Alexander McCall-Smith

All definitely would recommend as a good read.

am now on a Wilbur Smith - Blue Horizon, which is a first for me, but I love books about Africa so my husband recommended I read him. It is a mammoth book though. I like Murakami too. Have read Dance, Dance, Dance by him which was really surreal and reminded me of Bladerunner in a weird kind of way. Have got some short stories by him "The Elephant Vanishes" but have only read one so far. Have got "The Quincunx" as someone said it is really good and better than "The crimson petal and the white" and similar theme of Victorian England but again it is a mammoth read. I don't have enough time to read as I drive to work and always find those talking tapes of books too distracting when driving.

#42 andyb

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 05:19 PM

am now on a Wilbur Smith - Blue Horizon, which is a first for me, but I love books about Africa so my husband recommended I read him.

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Smith writes with a passion about Africa but he also has his dodgy moments (ingrained racism etc.).

What kind of thing do you want to read? - fiction, non-fiction etc.

I could probably recommend a few things as it's one of my loves as well.

(And of course there's also this. :ph34r: )

#43 Guest_boyan_*

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 12:29 PM

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

I'm only on the third chapter, but this book often has me in stitches - a "Rock'n'Roll Cook's Tale" as one reviewer on amazon.com appropriately described it. I do like that sort of gritty, no nonsense, no pussying about, auto biographical writing.

Next book on the hit list is "The Da Vinci Code", which everyone's raving about, so I have to see what all the fuss is about.

#44 Dazza

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 12:50 PM

Just read turbulent priests by Colin Bateman very funny as was empire state anyone want them their freebies

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#45 peanut

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 01:31 PM

reading The Bone Collector by Jeffrey Deaver at the mo, 40 pages to go and very enjoyable CSI style crime thiller

If anyone fancies a crime novel (all be it a bit disturbing) based around Brockwell Park and surrounding suburbs I can recommend The Treatment by Mo Hayder