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#16 James

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 11:01 AM

You can get Ad-Aware SE Personal and Norton Antivirus with 6 months of updates as part of the Google Pack... http://www.google.com/support/pack

Google Earth is included and is now available for Macs too.

Just in case you are wondering... "all the software in the Google Pack is free"

BTW: Mac users may need to consider getting this if they buy a new Intel based Mac and have installed Windows on it.

Yesterday, Mac = Mac

Today, Mac with Intel = Mac + Mac running Windows if you want to.

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#17 Fang

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 11:34 AM

I've just been looking at the new Apple Lap tops on their web site. Really gorgeous very fast and it comes with a great array of software. I'm glad to see that they haven't whacked the price up (too much). But I don't think you can run Windows OS on them (who would want to anyway). Also the presence of the Intel chip does not mean that Macs are now susceptible to all the "Viri", spy-ware, zombies etc. etc. that afflict Microsoft users. In fact, loading Norton Anti Virus software onto a Mac running OSx causes all sorts of problems and is not necessary.

"This is what we find, this is what we find, the hope that springs eternal, springs right up your behind."

#18 James

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 01:40 PM

Just to clarify, Apple Macs come with Mac OS X as the system software and aren't vulnerable to the same security weaknesses as Windows.

However, if you want to you can install Linux onto Macs (for free) and use that as the system software instead, and with the advent of Intel chips you now have the option to buy and install Windows onto the same computer too.

Linux and Windows aren't intended as standard installation options but they are possible if you know what you are doing.

Web developers are likely to take advantage of switching their computer operating system over to Windows for testing web design layouts. It will also make bespoke PC-only software such as Actinic Catalog available to Apple users without the requirement for a second PC.

Mind you, with all the different web browsers and devices out there it isn't practical to tip-toe around all the current gremlins in web design any more. The current trend is to make the page design compliant with accepted web standards and cater for browser differences by letting them go wrong 'gracefully'. This also creates the inertia for users to upgrade their browser to something more modern and a step change in web design dubbed "Web 2" which combines HTML with CSS and Javascript in a way known as AJAX. Our member map is an example of AJAX in action (the page changes as you work with it even though you don't reload the page).

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#19 James

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 03:14 AM

It's quite geeky and painful to read but it looks as though some people have managed to get OS X installed onto their PCs.

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#20 Fang

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 10:05 AM

They really do need to get out more! I'm still not entirely sure what the point is of all their endevaours. Is it a Beta version of OSX (Intel Version?) they are messing around with?

"This is what we find, this is what we find, the hope that springs eternal, springs right up your behind."

#21 James

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 03:47 PM

Linux and Windows aren't intended as standard installation options but they are possible if you know what you are doing.

Apple has just released some software to make the process of installing Windows on an Intel Mac easier, and it will become a standard option in future models.

When I heard about this I had visions of a new logo for Apple... an apple with a bite taken out of it (same as before) and then a little wriggly worm coming out of the bitemark with a smile on his face.

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#22 James

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 06:07 PM

Swiftly followed by the first reports of The Blue Screen of Death on a Mac

I guess that means it is correctly installed?? ;)

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#23 andyb

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:05 PM

Depressing, isn't it. I'm quite pleased I managed to get my Mac just before Intel invaded.


Still connectivity isn't really a problem for me over here - my internet connection relies on donkeys.

#24 Fang

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:38 PM

I realise that Apple had little choice but to go down the Intel route. It was the right decision. But I just can't understand why people need to run a Microsoft OS on a Mac. It's sacrilege. They would be better off going to pc world and buying a £300 Dell.

"This is what we find, this is what we find, the hope that springs eternal, springs right up your behind."

#25 James

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 09:58 PM

I would spend the £20 for an XP license and install Windows on my (next) Mac!

As a web designer it is important for me to be able to troubleshoot the many different Internet Explorer browser bugs so that I can make better web sites. As it stands my web design is based on w3c web standards and accumulated experience of what does work and the support of fellow designers (PC based) who help me out from time to time with new issues. If I had Windows I could try out novel bits of web code and just see how they turn out.

However, I'm a bit disappointed with the tone of language used by Apple on the Boot Camp web page. It's a good move to support XP on Macs, rather than wait for hackers to do an unauthorised version, but there's really no need to rub Microsoft's nose in it.

The sidebar comments, whilst all true, won't win the hearts of someone that previously made a personal choice to pick XP for their operating system. They are effectively telling a potential customer that their previous purchase decision was inherently wrong. It's a golden rule in sales - the customer is always right!

There is some weird Apple marketing from MacWarehouse at the moment. It is currently promoting old non-Intel Macs because the next generation versions of Adobe + Quark products aren't due until next year and Rosetta is slower than native Mac OS X. Their pitch is as follows...

- Intel compatible Pro applications from Apple (Final Cut etc.) are not shipping as yet
- Adobe does not plan to re-release current products as Universal applications that can run natively on both Intel and PowerPC based systems. They are more focused on delivering the next version of these products as Universal applications in the next 18 - 24 months.
- Adobe may not be able to address installation or compatibility and other issues that arise from running under Rosetta. Rosetta dynamically translates most of your PowerPC-based applications to work with your Intel-based Mac.
- Applications which will run on Rosetta will run noticeably slower
- There are no plans to re-release Office 2004; the next version of Office for Mac will be released in 2-3 years.
- Virtual PC does not run on Intel-based Macs.
- Quark will only be Universally ready in 3-6 months time

This is what happens when you leave your distributor's with loads of stock now perceived to be 'obsolete'. Anti-marketing of a future product is their only way out.

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#26 James

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 05:09 PM

http://news.bbc.co.u...ogy/5150508.stm

Security threats to PCs with Microsoft Windows have increased so much that computer users should consider using a Mac, says a leading security firm. Sophos security said that the 10 most commonly found pieces of malicious software all targeted Windows machines.

The advice from Sophos was given as it released a report, detailing the security threats posed to computers so far in 2006.

I have been using Macs for more than 15 years now. I can't remember a security firm ever recommending Mac vs PC before.

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#27 Retired_Member_2

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 05:36 PM

As a programmer I'll only consider moving over to a Mac when the Microsoft .Net Framework is ported across. If I wasn't a programmer I think I would have switched ages ago

#28 James

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 08:58 PM

Google is giving away a free copy of Norton Antivirus, with 6 months of free updates. It is bundled with other free software including Ad-Aware...
http://pack.google.c...s...en-gb&gl=uk

This free software is only available for PCs

I know that many people buy the latest version of Symantec's Norton Antivirus when their year's subscription expires. It costs about £25/£35 in the shops. However, if you use the Live Update software that is included it will download and update your software whenever required. When your subscription expires you can renew it online. Online renewals only cost £3 for 12 months. Make sure you take it up and renew online when prompted (there and then) because there is not an obvious way of getting the renewal link back. At £3 it's a price that is very hard to beat!

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#29 Elmo

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 09:39 PM

I've moved over to F-Secure for our firewall and anti-virus recently and it seems pretty good. Not as memory hungry as Norton... :)
Jermaine was right... "You can't reason with stupidity"

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#30 James

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 09:02 AM

You can get F-Secure for free from Barclays...
http://software.sili...39159181,00.htm

Barclays Bank is offering F-Secure's basic antivirus package to its 1.6 million active online customers for two years.

The bank has actually bought more than 1.6 million licences for F-Secure Anti-Virus.

Barnaby Davis, director of electronic banking at Barclays, said: "We had to be flexible enough to offer all our customers protection, so we have ample licences. Quite a few people will sign up, so we're going to need a fair few up our sleeves."

The basic package will include antivirus, anti-spyware, and anti-rootkit protection. It is billed as a free download but users can choose to pay for an installation CD and will also be charged for any customer support calls to F-Secure.

Richard Hales, country manager at F-Secure UK, told silicon.com sister site ZDNet UK: "It's a two-year agreement to provide cover and continuous [Barclays]customer support. Although if people signed up today then left Barclays they would still get a year's support. Hopefully that won't happen too much."

A two-year F-Secure subscription currently costs more than £45.

Hales said that as well as the commercial opportunity of selling the licences to Barclays, F-Secure is hoping consumers will decide to upgrade to a service with a personal firewall, parental controls and spam filter.


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