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Cat Rescue Homes


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#1 Will on the Hill

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 10:26 AM

Hi,

Has anyone had any good or bad experiences with getting a cat from a local cat rescue home?

I had decided that I would like a pair of cats and have been waiting til I had moved to a placed I owned that had a garden and I would be there permanently. I moved to CP and have been doing some research into cats by reading, searching the internet and looking on local cat rescue websites.

It seems that the way things are done is that when you contact the rescue home that they take your details then someone calls you back and then they complete a home visit to match your environment and lifestyle with an age and temperament of a cat.

I recently had a visit from the Coydon Cat Protection Society. I was quite excited and had spent the whole of the day before getting the flat looking spotless. I live a fairly sizeable ground floor cat with a garden that backs on to the park. The previous owners were cat owners and not only did they leave a cat flap but also a scratcing post!

The woman form the cat proetction society came to the front step and refused even to come in saying that my garden was too small (she hadn't even seen it!) and that I couldn't have young cats because they would be bored and I couldn't have older cats because it was the first time I had sole responsibility for a cat!

Has anyone had any better experiences with other cat rescue homes or other ideas?

Thanks

Will

#2 triangle fan

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 01:12 PM

Hi Will
I am very surprised at the attitude of the lady from the cats protection league. I had a cat( jess :rolleyes: ) from them nearly 6 years ago. I live in a ground floor flat with a small garden and they were more then happy to let me have a cat. Perhaps she was having a bad day! Battersea doga and cats home have plenty of cats for rehoming. They have all the cats for rehoming on the web.

#3 gekko

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 03:10 PM

I live a fairly sizeable ground floor cat with a garden


Maybe that's why she said you can't have a cat LOL :D .

Seriously though, that sounds ludicrous to me. We got our kittens from Celia Hammond (you'll find the contact details if you do a search on the forum). We phoned them and they came to do a visit. The woman was very pleasant, advising us on how we could make the house and garden suitable for kittens. She even tried to persuade us to take a whole litter!! To be honest, they have so many cats there needing to be rehomed, that as long as they think you are sane (which I'm sure you are :) ) and your house doesn't present any dangers to cats, you are unlikely to have a problem.

Most cat homes are operating on very small budgets and have more cats than space for them. They usually need to rehome the cats as quickly and safely as possible. I'm surprised at them being quite so picky really. I know they have the cats' best interests at heart but this seems a bit over the top.
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#4 lucysmith

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 04:59 PM

I got my cat from Battersea. They don't need to check your flat/house they just do a short interview with you prior to looking at their cats. Look at http://www.catchat.org/ for details of rescue centres across London and the South East. There are a lot of beautiful cats online waiting for a home!

PS - The first cat I had was from the Cats Protection League and I would agree with other people's comments. Ironically we have a fairly large garden etc and live on a quiet street, so they let us have a kitten and then a year later it went and got run over anyway!

Edited by lucysmith, 15 January 2006 - 05:00 PM.


#5 Will on the Hill

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 08:21 PM

Thanks all for your advice. I had already contacted Celia Hammond after the other lady had left, and have just managed to miss when they called so far, so hopefully they'll come around and be a bit more reasonable (i.e. at least come inside) ... it's really encouraging to know people have had good experiences with them .. thanks also for the other advice!

regards

Will

ps. well spotted with the typo, gekko - thankfully I don't live inside a cat. :-)

Edited by James, 15 January 2006 - 09:51 PM.


#6 Uncle Wilf

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 09:22 AM

Is it me or has the world gone a bit strange when you are assessed like this before you are allowed to have a cat?

I can't get my head round this.

There used to be Streatham Cats Rescue somewhere at the Tulse Hill end of Streatham,
When I was a boy we got a cat from there. I don't ever recall a "formal assessment" taking place.
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#7 weeble

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 09:39 AM

It is a bit daft, isn’t it – so many cats that need a home and they get picky about the size of your garden. I can understand that they need to check that conditions are basically suitable and that you’d be a responsible owner, but beyond that seems unreasonable.

I did some investigations about getting a re-homed ‘house cat’ and Celia Hammond seemed to be the only place willing to re-home to flats without outside space (generally just for older cats who weren’t used to going outside, or ill cats, afaik).

In the end a local cat ‘adopted’ us so we didn’t need to get a rescue cat, but Celia Hammond would be my first port of call if I did.

Good luck!

#8 Charlotte

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 10:23 AM

Our two (from Celia Hammond) are house cats and as they have never known anything different if exposed to the road, they wouldn't have a clue and probably get run over.

They came from old cat lady who had about 12 cats (which is far too extreme) in her flat, but could not look after them when she went into hospital indefinitely. We had a flat when we got them, but have a house now, and they show no desire in going outside. Celia Hammond have a section dedicated to indoor cats.

#9 drummerboy

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 01:12 PM

All I can say is you're making the right decision getting two rather than one. As a pair hey keep each other company. Good luck

#10 Sylvester

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 01:23 PM

I recently had a visit from the Coydon Cat Protection Society. I was quite excited and had spent the whole of the day before getting the flat looking spotless. I live a fairly sizeable ground floor cat with a garden that backs on to the park. The previous owners were cat owners and not only did they leave a cat flap but also a scratcing post!

The woman form the cat proetction society came to the front step and refused even to come in saying that my garden was too small (she hadn't even seen it!) and that I couldn't have young cats because they would be bored and I couldn't have older cats because it was the first time I had sole responsibility for a cat!


I showed this to my daughter who used to be involved with the Croydon ***. Without wishing to libel anyone, there are some people who let their love of cats get in the way of common sense. My daughter advised complaining to the ***, as unless people do complain this practice will go on - to the detriment of their homeless kitties.
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#11 gekko

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 02:57 PM

There you go Will. You just need to biologically produce a cat :D .
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#12 Sylvester

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 01:41 PM

Or rely on cats to do it for you... sometimes they have notices up in Vets surgeries when someone is looking for homes for unplanned kittens.
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#13 wmp

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 02:12 PM

I take my cat to the vets by Brockwell Park, & they often have a list of cats that need homes... (Given that my current cat keeps trying to commit suicide, the vet there has us on her list of potential mugs cat re-homers.) Vets may also have old cats that need homes and are often left on the shelf (as it were) as a lot of people prefer kittens - we took in an elderly black & white puss who was with us for 6 happy years.

#14 Mango

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 02:33 PM

considering that you don't have to be assessed before you decide to have children! (biologically I mean, not adopting them)


I think this would be an excellent idea. Some people really shouldn't breed. :o
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#15 elleme

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 02:36 PM

A friend of mine has an absolutely beautiful cat she got from Battersea. She lives in a small groundfloor flat in central London. While there is a paved central courtyard with small flower borders for the cat to sit in, she doesn't have a normal grassy back garden so to speak. They didn't have a problem with this. The only real oddity was that Battersea assessed the cat as not liking people and would likely be unsociable - maybe it was traumatised from the rescue at the time, as ever since it was rehomed it has been a friendly cat to owner and visitors alike.

Edited by elleme, 18 January 2006 - 02:40 PM.