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Composting and Green Waste


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#16 elleme

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 09:50 PM

I have a plastic compost bin and put in fruit and veg scraps, teabags, coffee grounds, comfrey leaves, annuals that have been pulled up, and endless jasmine and honeysuckle prunings if they aren't too woody. I avoid cooked food and I'm sure I've heard that citrus peel and onion skins aren't a great idea, though I can't remember why. I never seem to need to add liquid of any kind - I've heard that this is less necessary with a plastic bin as opposed to a more conventional heap. I don't worry too much about layers either, and it still makes good compost. Chuck your snails in and make them do some work!
http://www.gardenorg...ing/gh_comp.php

#17 gekko

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 10:03 AM

I think the citrus thing is to do with it making the compost too acidic.

Also had probs with fruit flies over the summer. Just fork over the heap and then place a layer of something like paper or organic compost on top. I also used some Growing Success organic repellent stuff that seemed to help a little bit.
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#18 HeadGardener

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 09:52 PM

A propos weeing on compost and the relative merits of male and female wee therein .....

This was the obligatory comedy question on Gardeners' Question Time at the weekend. The consensus was that either could be used and it was only anatomy that prevents women from weeing on their compost heaps as - according to a poll of the studio audience - men frequently do. Ages ago, I heard Bob Flowerdew say that wee should be diluted before being added to the compost and he recommended weeing into a bottle or watering can of water, where too I guess the male of the species has an advantage.

Apologies for lowering the tone. ;)

Edited by HeadGardener, 12 December 2006 - 09:53 PM.


#19 Knights Hiller

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 09:53 AM

Wee in a bottle? Are you taking the p*ss ?!

#20 HeadGardener

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 05:42 PM

Perish the thought. Merely passing on advice about organic gardening at its most organic. ;)

#21 Willy

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 01:53 PM

I am buying a house in Sydenham and intend to leave in a greener and more sustainable way, and to this end will be composting anything and everything I can but was wondering if someone can answer a question.

Is there any advantage to having both a compost bin and a wormery or do they do the same job? I've heard that composts should only be used for uncooked, non-meat foods otherwise they attract rats so what do I do with all the cooked/meaty bits?

#22 RachelF

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 02:25 PM

There's some useful advice on this site:

Wiggly Wigglers

I don't have any meat to chuck out, but I have been known to put cooked food in my beehive composter... and I have come across the odd little field mouse!
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#23 wmp

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 02:33 PM

A friend of mine, looking at my chicken carcass about to go into the dustbin (after I'd pressure-cooked it to get stock) suggested I get a green joanna, as well as the beehive composter I've already got from those nice Wiggly Wigglers people...

After some confusion I found information about the Green Joanna & Green Cone - apparently rodent proof, so the little field mouse would go hungry - but worth considering for the animal/fish/dairy waste. (I've not taken the plunge yet, but may do...)

Apropos the wee issue, we took Bob Flowerdew's advice of using it for our camellias - it has done them a great deal of good. The soil in our garden is mildly acid, but needs that little extra help.

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#24 Sylvester

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 11:04 AM

I can't wait to suggest my other half pees in our watering can - my camellia could do with a tonic. And April 1st is on its way! :lol:
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#25 HeadGardener

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 01:20 PM

Willy -

I find it useful to have both a Dalek-style compost bin and a wormery because (as you say) they do take different stuff. Even though we have a small garden we grow a lot in it and produce more composting material than the Dalek alone can deal with. Yesterday in (I think) the Green Gardener catalogue I saw a very smart composter which apparently can be used even for cooked food, because the new material goes into a sealed compartment at the top and then after it has been composting for a couple of weeks you let it down into the main compartment below, so rats can't get at the new food waste.

I'm just recovering from the ordeal of emptying out the wormery for the first time. I realise that I don't put enough cardboard and egg boxes etc in it (as you are supposed to) and the compost was wetter and pongier than it should have been. I've resolved to do better next time!

I'm intrigued by the notion of weeing on camellias, although I can understand the chemistry behind the saintly Mr Flowerdew's recommendation. We also have a bedraggled and ailing camellia so I will try to persuade Mr Under Gardener to do his duty. ;)

#26 wmp

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 02:38 PM

Before anyone kills their camellias with kindness & frightens the neighbours :lol: I might add that we dilute our offerings (roughly 1 to 3) having hidden in the garage with a bucket...

#27 HeadGardener

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 08:51 PM

Yes, Mr Flowerdew says you should dilute it, as otherwise it's too potent and could scorch the plants.

Three cheers for organic gardening (although I guess that, strictly, whether wee is organic depends on what one has been eating and drinking, in much the same way that not all milk is organic)! ;)

#28 Redbunny23

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 12:40 PM

Continued from the Croydon fortnightly collection thread...

Our bin is a Blackwall - though to confess it was a birthday present from Grandad bunny (yes! I am that sad!) so I'm not sure where he got it from.

Grandad Bunny loves a compost heap and has been composting for decades. It was his advice about the egg shells. He is also a very capable rat killer so I would imagine it's from experience. The advice of one ageing rodent about stopping others is only one opinion, I did find this useful page about rats and compost though http://www.recycleno...mpost_bins.html.

His other tip for good compost is cardboard and newspaper - anything that isn't coated so egg boxes (without the shells in!), loo rolls that sort of thing. Never mentioned weeing on it though!

Hope that helps- happy composting!

#29 RachelF

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 01:13 PM

I have use these

http://www.wigglywig...CFZRX4QodDliCWA
for cooked food scraps. They do get horribly smelly though if you don't attend to them properly (I assume that's why mine do at any rate) but they work.

I have a mouse nest in my compost bin at the moent, I think. A few weeks ago, I opened it and there was one on the top. The cat moved faster than I have ever seen him move, caught it, took it upstairs and lost it in the bedroom. I was not amused.
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#30 alywin

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 10:47 PM

It could be worse. I've had a bees' nest before, and 2 ants' nests this year. Not nice ...