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Roof Insulation


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#1 RachelF

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 11:42 AM

Has anyone had their roof insulated? It's like a fridge in our kitchen in winter (olive oil 'sets') and I suspect there is nothing between the tiles and the (not very nice) slatted wooden ceiling.
Can anyone recommend anyone? I am also wondering how insulation would effect the roof itself if it ever needed replacing.
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#2 James

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 01:33 PM

If there isn't a void above your ceiling, and you have sufficient space below, you could have a new ceiling put in and insulation above that. You'd lose about a foot. I insulated the walls and ceilings in my previous flat and cut fuel bills to a third.

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#3 RachelF

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 03:41 PM

Thanks James. It's a tiny kitchen with a sloping ceiling, and I don't think my husband would be able to stand up in it if we lost a foot!

Perhaps that's why they didn't insulate it in the first place.
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#4 Borgus

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 05:12 PM

Wickes do 2400mm x 600mm x 50mm thk polystyrene sheets for insulation. They can be fixed in place using normal screws with over-sized washers and edges sealed with silicon. A finish of plasterboard, plywood or polystyrene tiles can be used to cover it up. We have used this in a similar situation and the difference is very noticeable.

Also try filling the voids under and behind fitted kitchen units with fibreglass insulation and sealing gaps around doors, windows and where the floor meets the walls.
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#5 RachelF

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:52 PM

Does insulation cease to work after a number of years?
I decided to investigate the kitchen roof and pulled down a bit of the ceiling (not as dramatic as it sounds) and it is 'insulated' with grey fluffy stuff.
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#6 vickyp

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 02:28 PM

Insulation comes in different thicknesses. Having just had our survey done, the roof in our house-to-be has insulation that is about 25/50mm thick, current recommendations are a minum of 200mm!

Can you get into the roof cavity at all, as James said, can you get into the void? That would be the easiest way to insulate it.

#7 RachelF

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 03:17 PM

Yes, I think so. The ceiling is made of lovely (not) pine slats which I could pull down, although I don't know if I can put them back.

The cavity seems to be stuffed full of the nasty grey stuff.

I probably need seomeone to come and look, but am not sure who would do this sort of thing.
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#8 Borgus

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 03:18 PM

Insulation usually comes in rolls, but is available as loose fill. As it has probably been there a while and there is not much space, loose fill was probably used.

It is likely to contain fibre glass particles, so caution should be used as it is a kitchen. Cover all surfaces and cupboards while working on exposed areas and use mask, protective glasses. long sleeved clothing and gloves. Cover exposed areas when work is finished.
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#9 James

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 03:59 PM

If it is grey and fluffy the insultation could be the type made from recycled newspapers. It is still probably a good idea to clear the decks before undertaking any work though. Building dust carries around the house very easily so a good all round tidy up before work starts might save you a lot of trouble later.

There is another type of fibrous inulation called pink panther. It costs a little bit more but isn't as itchy as the standard glass fibre. It looks like cotton wool and is just as effective.

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#10 RachelF

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 04:28 PM

thanks everyone!
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#11 Zirconium

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 02:32 PM

Acknowledged by builders as the best insulation material is a product called Kingspan, which comes in rigid foam sheets, very easy to cut, lay and it's clean. You will need much lower thickness compared to glass fibre. However it is very expensive (£35 for a 8x4 sheet 10 cm thick)