Jump to content


Photo

Central Hill Estate, history of


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 PersonalBest

PersonalBest

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 121 posts

Posted 20 February 2008 - 03:28 PM

Does anyone else share my interest in the Central Hill Estate - it's history and pre-history?

I've looked through the cuttings file in the Norwood Library and gather it was a bit of a showpiece in the early 1970s. And I gather that some big Victorian semis and detatched houses were knocked down to make way for what originally going to be a high as opposed to today's low-rise estate.

#2 Retired Member 1

Retired Member 1

    Member

  • Retired Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,716 posts

Posted 20 February 2008 - 04:24 PM

I understand that the area was heavily bombed during WWII and that's why the houses were knocked down + there is a Nuclear bunker somewhere in the area
Gipsy Hill Rocks!!!

#3 Dazza

Dazza

    Council Boy

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,327 posts

Posted 20 February 2008 - 05:42 PM

My mums partner worked on the project & I can remember it being built. It was meant to be the state of the art as I understand as the concrete units were moulded on site which was quite a new concept.

It replaced some of the most amazing grand houses in the area. An absolute shame.

Now its a breeding & training ground for well you can guess that without me labelling anyone!

Dazza

Edited by Dazza, 20 February 2008 - 05:43 PM.

Your obviously mistaken me with someone who gives a fig

#4 Spoon

Spoon

    Paolo Di Catio's mum

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,033 posts

Posted 20 February 2008 - 05:46 PM

But can we definitely be comforted by the fact that what was pulled down to make way for the current estate was bombed and therefore inevitably going anyway? The thought that a healthy piece of architecture was lost for the estate that's there now made me so cross I couldn't get into talking about it until LSPE's post saying it might have been on the way out anyway.

#5 Retired Member 1

Retired Member 1

    Member

  • Retired Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,716 posts

Posted 20 February 2008 - 10:09 PM

My mums partner worked on the project & I can remember it being built.
Dazza



you lucky lad - you so both the Estate and the Crystal Palace being built :-)
Gipsy Hill Rocks!!!

#6 PersonalBest

PersonalBest

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 121 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 10:03 AM

Thanks for the information, but lummy, I feel ever so slightly stigmatised. I've read somewhere that Lambeth's chief architect, Ted Holamby (?), lived in and restored William Morris's Red House - the arts and crafts masterpiece, which is a riot of ingle nooks and pitched roofs.

But Holamby, was also fond of a spot of exposed concrete and Le Corbusieur, hence the flat roofs and those rubbish shoots that look like bits of the Maginot Line.

#7 Dazza

Dazza

    Council Boy

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,327 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 10:20 AM

Bet that estate will be the last thing standing in upper norwood when doomsday eventually comes !

Dazza
Your obviously mistaken me with someone who gives a fig

#8 PersonalBest

PersonalBest

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 121 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 10:24 AM

Cold comfort. Handy to have Control 51C over the road, aka, the bomb-proof basement of Pear Tree House.

http://www.subbrit.o...ear_tree_house/

#9 Made in SE19

Made in SE19

    Member

  • Members 2
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 56 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 08:20 PM

I have very happy memories of growing up on Central Hill Estate. My first home was next to Christ Church on Gipsy Hill, but in the early-70s we lived at Number 1, Bankside Way, right next to the steps that ran down alongside the police station. This was the second level down, the top level was Ridgeway. The flat was quite unusual in that it was the other way around and the living room and kitchen were on the upstairs level and then we had to go downstairs to bed or to use the loo. My dad had this strange idea of keeping the plants on the rear balcony in old sinks that he covered with artex. But playing on the Estate as a kid was a huge adventure and there were all the brick slopes and dustbin areas to mess around with.

#10 PersonalBest

PersonalBest

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 121 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 10:02 AM

your Dad's balcony sounds like a piece of folk art. I wonder whether the plan was to build in a few planters and it got dropped due to cost. Because having a yard, balcony and terrace (not that I'm complaining) does mean an aweful lot of containers and soil to turn into something greener. Hence, alas, the fact that most of them are so bare, or merely outdoor storage.

In the 70s, before Lambeth council had a chance to neglect the estate, it must have looked quite snazzy: club med, even.

#11 James

James

    Member

  • Sponsors
  • 4,833 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 10:23 AM

Neglect the estate? I bet there are quite a few householders that would like to see Lambeth put as much effort into looking after their street as they do on the estate. When was the last time you saw a crew of gardeners going down your road with leaf blowers?

European.vote - EU Referendum


#12 PersonalBest

PersonalBest

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 121 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 10:28 AM

Point taken. I was thinking of the broken glass and half dozen empty homes gathering tumbleweed.

#13 Made in SE19

Made in SE19

    Member

  • Members 2
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 56 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 11:54 AM

Club med ... haha, that's a great analogy and the balconies do look a bit like that. The sinks weren't exactly William Morris, but they did the trick. I think they were constructed in a fairly soulless way, though, and it's a pity that the council has to appoint special people to do the gardens without considering for a moment that people might actually wish to grow their own plants.