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Poll: Cheese and Onion vs Salt and Vinegar (46 member(s) have cast votes)

Which flavour do you prefer?

  1. Cheese and Onion (17 votes [36.96%])

    Percentage of vote: 36.96%

  2. Salt and Vinegar (29 votes [63.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 63.04%

Which way round should the colours go?

  1. Cheese and Onion is Blue - Salt and Vinegar is Green (6 votes [13.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.04%

  2. Cheese and Onion is Green - Salt and Vinegar is Blue (40 votes [86.96%])

    Percentage of vote: 86.96%

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#46 Ziwa

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 02:00 PM

Whatever happened to (part 94)....Mesquito Kettle Chips? They were like catnip to us in the early noughties. Honey Barbecue don't cut it.

Nanazola, imaginative though the British crisp manufacturers are, I seriously doubt they made mosquito flavoured crisps!
You might be mixing up your desert trees and your insect vectors for malaria, dengue, etc - the former makes a great charcoal for BarBs, the latter is rarely considered foodstuff except by bats.

#47 jannism

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 02:55 PM

Salsa with Mesquite flavour. Suspect it was an attempt at mesquite honey as opposed to the album by -Ziq.

Or a city in an any number of US states...How would that work? Salt-Lake city flavour, maybe...

#48 guineagirl

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 03:39 PM

I've seen the Mesquite flavour within the past 5 years, so it's not a pre-Noughties trend by any means!

But think I only ever used to see them in a local cafe when I lived in SE1, so perhaps one of these bizarre phenomenons where a certain postcode gets a splurge on some consumer products and no-one else does. That cafe also sold Teriyaki Kettle Chips, and I'm sure I've never seen *those* for sale anywhere else...

(On a similar trend, there was also the sad thread a few weeks back about the sudden mysterious disappearance of Reeses' Peanut Butter Cups from South London postcodes...I'm sure I've seen them in central London in the last few weeks!)

I'd like to shout out for Seabrook's Salt and Vinegar - best crisps anywhere by a mile. They ran a big ad campaign a few years ago to launch Seabrook's nationwide, after being the Crisp of the North for so many years...but I've still never seen them for sale anywhere south of Derby.

Edited by guineagirl, 21 May 2009 - 03:41 PM.


#49 Nanazola

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 04:49 PM

Gah, you're all correct - I meant mesquite. Or salsa with mesquite. I didn't read the small print before scarfing em.

As to whether it was Jannism's mesquite honey or Ziwa's mesquite-charcoal-bbq flavour, I go with the latter. Ohhh that smokey savour!

#50 Nick

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 05:04 PM

I'm still in shock that there is a company that wanted to argue that Pringles aren't crisps! Now I do wonder what's in there...
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#51 James

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 05:39 PM

In my mind a proper crisp is a fried slice of potato, anything that is reformed or made with other ingredients is a snack.

Meanwhile, back on the ranch (as in ranch chips, geddit?), Mike-sell's Potato Chip Company which is billed as the oldest potato chip company in the United States will be celebrating it's centenary next year.

In other wiki-news, the world's first seasoned crisps, Cheese & Onion and Salt & Vinegar, were created by Joe "Spud" Murphy, the owner of the Irish crisp company called Tayto, founded 1954. Thank you Spud! :)

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#52 smallB

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 01:52 PM

Golden Wonder crisps, with the proper colours for cheese & onion (green) and salt n vinegar (blue), are still available up in Scotland. You can buy them online too.

For me the best are plain Hula Hoops. Nothing can touch em.

#53 claudia

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 10:25 PM

I'm still in shock that there is a company that wanted to argue that Pringles aren't crisps! Now I do wonder what's in there...


A crisp is a fried slice of potato. Pringles are potato based, but, like hula hoops (sorry smallB), and made from mushing up potato flour, rice flour, fats and various other stuff into a random shape. Its just pringles tried to shape it into a crisp-shaped shape :) but for VAT purposes it's better not to be a crisp. Like jaffa cakes are better off not being biscuits.

#54 Ziwa

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 03:17 PM

What, is there an extra heavy crisp-tax in this country?!
Now that, I agree, is exploiting the populace!

#55 Nick

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 06:15 PM

What, is there an extra heavy crisp-tax in this country?!
Now that, I agree, is exploiting the populace!


http://news.bbc.co.u...ess/8060204.stm

Pringles lose Appeal Court case

Procter & Gamble will be forced to pay tens of millions of pounds in VAT after losing a legal battle with the taxman over its Pringles snack.

The Court of Appeal ruled in favour of the Revenue, which has long maintained that Pringles constitute a potato snack and are, therefore, liable for VAT.

A High Court judge ruled last summer that the snack was exempt from the tax.

Foods are usually exempt from VAT, but one of the few exceptions is the humble potato crisp.

'Reasonable view'

A High Court judge ruled last July that Pringles' packaging, "unnatural shape" and the fact that the potato content is less than 50% meant the snack was exempt from VAT.

The Appeal Court judges disagreed.

"There is more than enough potato content for it to be a reasonable view that it is made from potato," said Lord Justice Jacob.

Potatoes make up 42% of the Pringles' ingredients.

He added that the lawyer acting for the Revenue advised him the VAT due on the sale of Pringles was "as much as 100m of tax for the past and about 20m a year for the future."

But a spokesperson for Procter & Gamble said the company had been paying VAT on the snack pending the appeal process, and so was not liable for any back taxes.

Unnatural

While praising the "simplicity and common sense" of the judges, Toby O'Reilly, director in indirect tax at Ernst & Young, said an opportunity had been missed to provide "coherent guidance" on which snacks are, and which are not, subject to VAT.

At last year's High Court hearing, Procter & Gamble insisted that their best-selling product was not similar to potato crisps, because of their "mouth melt" taste, "uniform colour" and "regular shape" which "is not found in nature".

It also argued that potato crisps - unlike Pringles - did not contain non-potato flours, and were not packaged in tubes.

Pringles are more like a cake or a biscuit, it claimed, because they are manufactured from dough.


Generally unprepared food is not VAT liable, whereas cooked food is. Hence if you go into a Greggs and ask for a hot sausage roll it costs more than a cold one.
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#56 hellnick

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 06:40 AM

In my mind a proper crisp is a fried slice of potato, anything that is reformed or made with other ingredients is a snack.

Meanwhile, back on the ranch (as in ranch chips, geddit?), Mike-sell's Potato Chip Company which is billed as the oldest potato chip company in the United States will be celebrating it's centenary next year.

In other wiki-news, the world's first seasoned crisps, Cheese & Onion and Salt & Vinegar, were created by Joe "Spud" Murphy, the owner of the Irish crisp company called Tayto, founded 1954. Thank you Spud! :)


Tayto Cheese and Onion crisps were top of the list of foodstuffs smuggled over by visiting family when we moved from Ireland in the 70s - there are still dedicated vending machines at the airports allowing people to stock up before leaving. Second was steak sausages - English sausages were just awful.

#57 jannism

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:18 PM

My generation theory holds no water it seems as my 10 year old can remember Golden Wonder's green for C+O and blue for S+V...

#58 guineagirl

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 10:52 AM

You can get Tayto crisps at the Windmill pub on the Cut in Waterloo (sorry that it's not local, but it is south of the river, anyway)...I was there on Bank Holiday Monday and my Irish friend was delighted to be able to get her local brand in London!

I thought they were nice - the salt and vinegar flavour very subtle, not nearly as salty as they usually are.

Personally speaking, Mini Cheddars are hard to beat...

#59 charlie

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 12:52 PM

The salsa and mequite Kettles were sorely missed this weekend. Perfect for dipping into houmus and guacamole!

Edited by charlie, 27 May 2009 - 12:53 PM.