Jump to content


Photo

Aubin's Pauper School, Church Road


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 andreas

andreas

    Member

  • Sponsors
  • 1,982 posts

Posted 20 December 2009 - 08:45 PM

http://www.workhouse...lLondonSD.shtml

I thought this was interesting. Here's a bit more about the school:

Between 1819 and 1822, a Mr Hayward set up an “establishment for the infant poor of both sexes” at the corner of Church Road and Westow Hill. In 1825, Frederick George Aubin took over the school. He held the contract for housing the poor children of the parishes of the City of London; St Saviour’s, Southwark and St Martin-in-the-Fields. Initially, he was required only to feed and clothe the children. There was no recreational activity and as John Coulter puts it, “most of the children’s time was employed in the interesting occupation of sorting bristles, and making hooks and eyes.

The children were rarely allowed to leave the complex, except when relatives made a visit. John Coulter records contemporary evidence that “When these relations visit the children at Norwood they often present themselves drunk. It is difficult, after they have come some miles, to refuse the interview... If they are permitted to take the children for a walk... they delight to carry them to the nearest tavern and to persuade them to take spirits.

In the 1830s, the Poor Law Commissioners made several inspections, resulting in a number of reports. For between 1833 and 1836, 66 children died at the school. In 1838, of the 91 burials at All Saints’ Church, 72 were for young children, many less than six months’ old, and all from the Norwood Infant Poor House. The Commissioners considered, however, that Aubin was “an intelligent, honest and active contractor, ready to adopt all reasonable improvements.

In 1839, Lord John Russell (1792-1878), the Home Secretary, made an official inspection. As a result, an annual grant was obtained from the Treasury towards the costs of additional buildings and staff. The medical adviser to the Poor Law Commission supervised sanitary improvements to the buildings; green baize curtains were installed to divide halls into classrooms; textbooks and desks were bought and extra teachers employed.

By 1840, the school occupied a quarter of the interior of the Triangle. It housed about 1,100 boys and girls: indeed in the 1840s, over 25% of the population of Norwood consisted of infant paupers in such institutions.

In the exercise yard, a Greenwich pensioner erected a mast. According to J B Wilson, once a month the boys being trained for the sea would man the rigging and sing the national anthem. Four six-pounders were provided for the practice of manoeuvres: every so often a cannon was fired; once it blew down the fence.

The school received visits from educational theorists, as it was seen as an ideal model for other guardians of the poor to emulate. Dr Kay Shuttleworth, a pioneer of public education and teacher training, researched at the school in the 1830s and 1840s.

Following legislation in 1845, parishes were allowed to combine themselves into School Districts. The London Central District Industrial School purchased Aubin’s establishment and appointed him as the first superintendent master in 1846.

Cholera outbreaks continued: 14 children died in 1853. The Governors bought cottages in Church Road and Westow Hill in the early 1850s, with the aim of enlarging the school and improving the facilities. For in 1854, there were 1,024 resident children who slept three to a bed.

The arrival of the Crystal Palace in 1854 was, according to John Coulter, considered by the Central London School Board to present a serious moral danger to the children. Moreover, it increased the value of the land occupied by the school itself and the acres leased from Dulwich College to the west of the Parade – where the children received agricultural training.

So, in 1856, the Board bought a large site at Hanwell, west of Ealing, to which the children were moved in 1857. All the school buildings in the Triangle were demolished; the cleared space was sold to developers in 1860.

The Central District School at Hanwell continued to house up to 1,000 or so children, including Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977). It closed in 1933 .

Edited by andreas, 20 December 2009 - 08:46 PM.

opposed to taking terrapins.

#2 Nanazola

Nanazola

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,460 posts

Posted 21 December 2009 - 09:25 AM

Wow, fascinating andreas, thanks for this.

I wonder which tavern the visiting parents made off to!

#3 RetiredMember1

RetiredMember1

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,066 posts

Posted 21 December 2009 - 05:56 PM

Yes, really interesting!

#4 NickJ

NickJ

    Member

  • Members 3
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 471 posts

Posted 23 December 2009 - 01:05 PM

“most of the children’s time was employed in the interesting occupation of sorting bristles

Four six-pounders were provided for the practice of manoeuvres: every so often a cannon was fired; once it blew down the fence.


Maybe it's time to re-introduce our young people to simple, yet fascinating, pleasures such as sorting bristles!

Giving them field guns to play with might not be such a good idea, though...

#5 Joe

Joe

    Member

  • Members 2
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 139 posts

Posted 05 January 2010 - 12:36 AM

The Central District School at Hanwell continued to house up to 1,000 or so children, including Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977). It closed in 1933 .


Wow !