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#16 Janee

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 07:47 PM

:o Can't believe you were quoted £2-3k for one door!!
The other thing to bear in mind is building regs, if this is the main point of entry to your dwelling it will need to be wheelchair friendly.

The average price for a pvc door in N.Ireland would be C£400 Bit of a difference!

I live in N.I. but my daughter moved to S.Norwood recently so I have been lurking on here for a while :D

Edited by Janee, 18 July 2010 - 07:49 PM.


#17 Dazza

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 08:56 PM

In refurbishment its all about not makings the situation any worse. Disabled access it really only applicable to the front door access.

I deal with the building regs in the glazing business for a trade body . Feel free to contact me if you need any further advice.

Dazza
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#18 Heritage

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 08:15 PM

Disabled access does not come into play if it was not already catered for.

#19 Janee

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 08:18 AM

Disabled access does not come into play if it was not already catered for.



If you are replacing the main entrance door to the property (which being the front door it presumably is the main entrance) then it sounds like it does apply:


http://www.planningp...egsdoorswindows

"Access to buildings

When replacing main entrance doors in a dwelling unit that has been constructed since 1999, it is important to ensure that the threshold remains level otherwise the works will not comply with the Building Regulations as it would be making the threshold worst than it was when constructed. This is to enable a wheelchair user to have continued access to the dwelling."

(Someone should have had a proof reader for the above! :rolleyes: )

#20 Dazza

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 08:52 AM

Heritage is exactly right. If the original door does not have a disabled access then the replacement door does not have to have an disabled access. Document M of the building regs refurbishment rules however in new build this is mandatory.

You are even allowed to increase the threshold if the front door is open to the elements & the threshold has to be increased to avoid water egress !

However it is always best practice to put a disabled access where possible on the main front door area & keep the threshold as low as possible to avoid trip hazzards.

Dazza

PS If you want advice or want a quote to install door or windows feel free to contact me . I work very closely with a company who fit either wood or UPVC the company is also a FENSA registered business. Mobile 07970 194116
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#21 Janee

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 04:18 PM

OK, now I'm totally confused! :unsure:
So, you're saying the building regs I quoted above (from the government website) do not apply? They seem pretty clear...
Not meaning to be awkward, I hope they don't apply as we also have to replace a door :rolleyes:

#22 Dazza

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 06:57 PM

The building regs are more rigid for new builds, in refurbishment scenarios they are more flexible & the rule is not to make the situation any worse that what present in the outgoing design.

So if there was no disable access the replacement does not need to have a disabled access but to be made no worse that what was removed.

Blimey bit of a busman hol for me that answer !

Dazza

PS The statement you highlighted is exactly true but in a new build scenario only , but dont worry the building regs are not really user friendly.
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#23 Heritage

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 10:02 PM

Hi Janee the referance to building regs you quoted refers to how high the threshold is and in most circumstances at Heritage we would always if possible fit the lowest threshold, but wheelchair access is not only about the hieght of the threshold more importantly it is the width of the door, so my point is that if you had a door width of 850mm you would not be expected to replace your door with a 1000 mm door.Ps I guess I just agreed with the last part of Dazza s answer.

Edited by Heritage, 20 July 2010 - 10:04 PM.


#24 Sylvester

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 12:35 PM

I would have thought in a lot of cases the low-threshold requirement would not apply as there are often steps up to the front door, which a wheelchair couldn't manage anyway.
aka Pie

#25 Dazza

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 01:09 PM

Believe it or not that is not taken into consideration on this building regualtion.
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#26 Palacegirl

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 10:06 AM

Back to my (current) favourite topic of : front doors.

Anybody heard of 'rockdoors' (composite) doors before? I am speaking to a company called jsbwindows based in Bellingham - let me know if anybody has had any good/bad experiences with them.
I will also contact the window clinic again for a quote.

I am looking for a stable type door but have to have a cat flap fitted in the bottom half. I don't really want to have a wood door as I don't want the hassle / worry of treatment/painting etc....
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#27 Dazza

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 11:01 AM

Yep have heard of Rockdoors befores & JSB windows FENSA registration 27922 registered since 01/04/2005 have a very good record with FENSA to date.

Dazza
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#28 Palacegirl

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 11:17 AM

Brilliant - I have found lot of good feedback for rockdoors and JSB windows seem to be the 'local' representative for the company.
Just depends on how much they will charge me

thanks for your feedback

..Palacegirl
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#29 Dazza

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 08:12 AM

Composite doors can be pretty pricey but they tend to be better quality than plain UPVC doors, also tend to have better thermal properties too!

Palacegirl get a quote for the product & fitting & will see if I can beat it with my guys !

Dazza
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#30 Andy

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 11:36 AM

Palace girl, maybe Im a bit late to this party but it sounds like that all you need to do is get a carpenter around properly shoot in your door / plane it down all around the edges, so it can shrink and swell as it needs to. It cant continually expand, as all it is doing is shrinking and swelling according to the weather conditions outside. (Wet = Swells up, Dry = Shrinking). And all timber doors do this, your door is just probably catching the frame where the one part of the door is closer then the rest, therefore causing you a problem.

You could also get some form of draught excluder to hopefully solve that problem as well, for a fraction of the price of a new door.