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is there more to life than this?


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#31 grahamb

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 11:56 AM

maybe it's because people feel empty spiritually that they turn to alcohol,drugs,etc?


Why pick alcohol and drugs? Maybe its because people feel empty spiritually that they turn to Haagen Dazs or compulsive viewing of soap operas?

Also, what does one mean by 'turn to'? Most of the people I know drink or have used some form of legal or illegal drug at some point, and for most of the people I know I would never consider them to be empty in a spiritual or moral sense.

Uncle Wilf - I would definitely support what you said above, and I would add that not everybody feels the need to wear their 'spirituality' on their sleeve.

Personally I suspect that people who live by their own moral code may be stronger than those who subscribe to ancient and inflexible belief systems, but that's just my view. And no offence is meant to anybody who practices any specific faith.

#32 Ziwa

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 05:51 PM

...and everyone's got to serve somebody.


Huh? I don't get that....dunno why you would have to serve somebody.
(unless its Dazza cuz he's waiting on his curry!)

... but what's the fruit.


Well, yeah, what IS the fruit? Often its xenophobia, which is toxic fruit, to be honest.

Edited by Ziwa, 17 September 2010 - 05:52 PM.


#33 Spike

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 08:26 AM

My background is anglo-catholic (aka having your cake and eating it on the Christian front) although lapsed in church attending terms for some time, so the AC is very much not my sort of thing. But each to his or her own. Talking of unity, and I hope this is not getting too controversial, the 'high' church down my road has a mission statement, or whatever you call it, to oppose women priests. There's anglo-catholicism for you!


Not all Anglo-Catholic places are like that. Come along to St John's on Sylvan Hill (already mentioned on this thread) and see!

#34 Dazza

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 08:38 AM

Good to see the pope apologise to all the childen in Ireland who were preyed upon by their priests !

Glad that makes it allright now !

What a guy !

Dazza

PS Birthday today & going to visit both my places of worship tonight ! ( Railway Bell & Palace spice)
Your obviously mistaken me with someone who gives a fig

#35 gekko

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 08:53 AM

Happy Birthday Dazza!
Mel, Forum Moderator

#36 Uncle Wilf

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 09:18 AM

Happy Birthday Dazza!


Happy birthday Dazza. Enjoy the Bell and Palace Spice. After payday I am due a return to Palace Spice.

Haven't been to the Bell for ages. Have to say I wasn't so keen on Youngs beer for a while after it moved from Wandsworth but it's back on form now.
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#37 RachelF

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 10:41 AM

Happy birthday, Dazza.
Sounds like the perfect evening!
Rachel
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#38 davidpuppet

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 10:08 AM

hope it went well? an 'apology' from the pope wouldn't make 'it alright', but to be fair i think he did say that he was deeply saddened and ashamed by it. that the issue, (and he used the word sin), had 'seriously undermined the moral credibility of the church. he also spoke of the devastating effects of child abuse, and the growing awareness of it in society. also the need to reach out with compassion to those who continue to suffer and use the lessons that have been learned. interesting to hear david cameron 'spin' the success of the pope's tour and message of hope with his 'big society' vision. does this mean politicians now 'can do God'?

#39 Sylvester

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 10:52 AM

An interesting thread this. I've just returned from holiday in Malta where there seems to be more churches per head of population than anywhere I can think of. People there don't seem to agonize over their faith (or lack of it) and their religion is accepted as part of normal daily life. I guess it's the same for many Muslims.

Although I am def not of any religious persuasion, it was lovely to see people getting together as a community and enjoying the social activity that goes along with the services - and all in some amazingly decorated buildings. There's nothing wrong with religion as long as it's not mixed up in politics!
aka Pie

#40 grahamb

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 12:37 PM

does this mean politicians now 'can do God'?


I think I remember Blair saying that 'God would be his judge' over the decision to go to Iraq.

Doesn't really mean anything though if you think about it, does it?!

#41 davidpuppet

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 04:21 PM

surely if you think about it, it means an awful lot! but i was thinking about the comment alistair cambell apparantely made when tony blair mentioned ending a speach to the nation, (similar to presidents have in the usa), with 'may God bless you', or 'may God bless Gt.Britain', and was advised, 'we don't do God'.

#42 grahamb

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:47 PM

surely if you think about it, it means an awful lot! but i was thinking about the comment alistair cambell apparantely made when tony blair mentioned ending a speach to the nation, (similar to presidents have in the usa), with 'may God bless you', or 'may God bless Gt.Britain', and was advised, 'we don't do God'.


What I meant was that it doesn't provide us with any rational facts with which to decide whether he was right or not about Iraq.

The fact that Blair subscribes to a particular belief system that he is able to use to justify his actions (probably to himself) is of no use or consequence whatsoever to all those who died out there (both Iraqi and British). In fact, in could be taken as an insult by some.

#43 davidpuppet

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 10:22 AM

i'm sure he wasn't doing that. he has said that the action he took he thought to be correct at the time.

#44 grahamb

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 01:53 PM

i'm sure he wasn't doing that. he has said that the action he took he thought to be correct at the time.



Yes but why bring god into it then?

#45 davidpuppet

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 03:41 PM

i would assume as a christian he meant that God would judge him on whether he truly believed he was doing the right thing. that God would know what was in his heart. that is why i said it seemed very important. i suppose it depends on ones faith though. as the writer c.s.lewis put it, 'christianity is a statement which, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. the one thing it cannot be is moderately important'.